Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University

Japanese

Surviving pluripotency: Understanding the fitness selection mechanisms operating during early mammalian development
Dr. Tristan A Rodriguez (Imperial College London, UK)

Date/Time

May 15, 2017 (Mon), 16:00-17:00

Place

2F Seminar room, BioSystems Building

Speaker

Dr. Tristan A Rodriguez (Imperial College London, UK)

Title

Surviving pluripotency: Understanding the fitness selection mechanisms operating during early mammalian development

Abstract

From the earliest embryonic divisions until the death of the organism, cells are subjected to a remarkable array of pressures that will compromise their fitness. Cell competition is a quality control mechanism that allows the comparison of fitness levels between cells and results in the elimination of those that although viable, are less-fit than their neighbours. The process has been primarily studied in Drosophila, where it plays beneficial roles in the optimization of tissue fitness during embryonic development, the regulation of organ size and the maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis during ageing. Interestingly, also in fly, cell competition has also been shown to be high-jacked by cancer cells to make space for their expansion and fuel their transformation. Over the last few years cell competition has been found to be conserved in mammals, but the mechanisms that regulate it and its physiological importance are poorly understood. Here we will present the identification of a p53-mTOR axis as a key determinant of the competitive behaviour of cells during early mouse development. We will discuss how this pathway determines relative cell fitness during the onset of differentiation, its importance for shaping embryonic growth and the implications of our findings for oncogenic transformation

Host

Hiroshi Sasaki