Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University

Japanese

"Colonization of the murine cerebral cortex by migrating GABAergic interneurons: the role of signals transduced into and outside the leading process." Dr. Christine Metin (Reseach Group Leader, Institut du Fer à Moulin, INSERM)

Date/Time

September 8, 13:00-14:30

Place

Seminar Room (3F), Nanobiology building

Speaker

Dr. Christine Metin
Reseach Group Leader, Institut du Fer à Moulin, INSERM

Title

Colonization of the murine cerebral cortex by migrating GABAergic interneurons: the role of signals transduced into and outside the leading process.

Abstract

GABAergic neurons can migrate long distances in the developing brain. In the forebrain of mouse embryos, GABA neurons generated in the medial and caudal ganglionic eminences of the basal telencephalon migrate first tangentially toward the cortex and then reorient radially toward the cortical plate in which they settle. Migration is the result of the interplay between intrinsic cell motility properties and extrinsic cues that influence and guide cell movements. At least two key structures in migrating INs can sense extrinsic guidance cues: 1) the leading edge that divides in several branches, each branch ending with a growth cone, which can explore the environment, and 2) the primary cilium, a recently discovered organelle at the surface of the migrating interneurons that is assembled by the centrosome at the surface of the cell body. We have analysed in migrating GABA neurons the role of a signal transduced in the primary cilium, the secreted morphogen Sonic Hedgehog, and the role of an adhesive signal that influences the dynamic properties of the leading process, the cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin.