Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University

Japanese

Colloquium 177

Speaker Shogo Nakayama(Department of Physiology(Tsukita Lab.) ・D1)/Hiroka Kashihara(Tsukita Lab.・D3)/Tomoki Yano(Tsukita Lab. ・Assistant professor)
Title "The role of the PCP protein Daple in coordinated ciliary beating in tracheal multi-ciliated cells"/"Molecular basis and hierarchical assembly of the centriole/basal body appendage in mammalian cells"/"The contribution of cellular metabolic states to the organization and the maintenance of tight junction and cytoskeleton regulation." 
Date Tue. Dec. 20,2017 12:15~
Place 2F Seminar room, Biosystems Building, FBS
Host Contact:Atsushi Tamura, Ph.D. (FBS Laboratory of Biological Sciences(Tsukita Lab.) , Assoc. Prof.)
Tel:06-6879-3321
E-mail:tsukiweb@biosci.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

Detail

〇Speaker 1 :Shogo Nakayama(Laboratory of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine(Tsukita Lab.), D1)

Affiliation:FBS Laboratory of Biological Sciences(Tsukita Lab.)
 
Title:"The role of the PCP protein Daple in coordinated ciliary beating in tracheal multi-ciliated cells" 

Abstract:
Multiciliated cells (MCCs) promote fluid flow through coordinated ciliary beating, which requires the proper alignment and orientation of ciliary basal bodies (BBs) due to the planar cellular polarity (PCP).  We have here analyzed the alignment and orientation of BBs in the tracheal multiciliated cells in the knockout mice of Daple, one kind of PCP proteins which is specifically expressed in multi-ciliated cells.  We found that the coordinated orientation of BBs was largely perturbed, although the BBs regularly aligned in Daple-deficient cells.  Since the biased localization of microtubules along the PCP axes was largely disturbed in these Daple-deficient multiciliated cells,  the roles of Daple in the alignment and orientation of BBs are dicussed with special reference to the PCP-dependent biased distribution of microtubules.

〇Speaker 2:Hiroka Kashihara(Laboratory of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine(Tsukita Lab.), D3)

Affiliation:FBS Laboratory of Biological Sciences(Tsukita Lab.)
 
Title:"Molecular basis and hierarchical assembly of the centriole/basal body appendage in mammalian cells"   

Abstract:
As the microtubule-organizing centers in animal cells, centrosomes play a pivotal role in various cellular events, depending on the cell cycle and sometimes functioning as a ciliary basal bodies (BB). A centrosome consists of two orthogonally arranged centrioles, termed the mother centriole (MC) and daughter centriole (DC). The MC is distinguished from the DC by proteinaceous accessory structures called the subdistal appendage (SA) and distal appendage (DA). We previously showed that the presence of these appendages depends on ODF2. Through integrative analysis on existing omics data of centrosomal/BB components, we have identified a novel ODF2-interacting protein Cep128. In this seminar, I'd like to discuss about the hierarchical assembly of the SA and its role in cell cycle progression.


〇Speaker 3:Tomoki Yano(Laboratory of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine(Tsukita Lab.), Assistant professor)

Affiliation:FBS Laboratory of Biological Sciences(Tsukita Lab.)
 
Title:"The contribution of cellular metabolic states to the organization and the maintenance of tight junction and cytoskeleton regulation." 

Abstract:
Adjacent epithelial cells adhere to one another via cell-cell contact apparatus, forming epithelial cell sheets. These sheets compartmentalize our body, so that specific homeostasis for individual organs and tissue types can be maintained from the ambient conditions of the outer environment. Recently we have presented that the microtubule network, localized beneath the apical membrane, is associated with tight junction (TJ) structures and the linkage is regulated by cellular metabolic activities. We have hypothesized that cellular metabolic states may contribute to the organization and the maintenance of epithelial tissue via TJ and cytoskeleton regulation. As the correlation between cellular metabolic activity and TJ remains largely unknown, addressing the molecular details of the regulation mechanism is crucial to further our understandings in the field. Today I would like to present a part of the mechanism we have discovered, which suggests a possible correlation between metabolic activity and TJ.

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Contact:Atsushi Tamura, Ph.D. (FBS Laboratory of Biological Sciences(Tsukita Lab.) , Assoc. Prof.)
Tel:06-6879-3321
E-mail:tsukiweb@biosci.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

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