Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University

Japanese

Random Walk Behavior of Migrating Cortical Interneurons in the Marginal Zone: Time-Lapse Analysis in Flat-Mount Cortex

Journal J Neurosci 29, 1300-1311 (2009)
Authors Daisuke H. Tanaka, Mitsutoshi Yanagida, Yan Zhu, Sakae Mikami, Takashi Nagasawa, Jun-ichi Miyazaki, Yuchio Yanagawa, Kunihiko Obata, and Fujio Murakami
Title Random Walk Behavior of Migrating Cortical Interneurons in the Marginal Zone: Time-Lapse Analysis in Flat-Mount Cortex
PubMed 19193877
Laboratory
Abstract Migrating neurons are thought to travel from their origin near the ventricle to distant territories along stereotypical pathways by detecting environmental cues in the extracellular milieu. Here, we report a novel mode of neuronal migration that challenges this view. We performed long-term, time-lapse imaging of medial ganglionic eminence (MGE)-derived cortical interneurons tangentially migrating in the marginal zone (MZ) in flat-mount cortices. We find that they exhibit a diverse range of behaviors in terms of the rate and direction of migration. Curiously, a predominant population of these neurons repeatedly changes its direction of migration in an unpredictable manner. Trajectories of migration vary from one neuron to another. The migration of individual cells lasts for long periods, sometimes up to 2 d. Theoretical analyses reveal that these behaviors can be modeled by a random walk. Furthermore, MZ cells migrate from the cortical subventricular zone to the cortical plate, transiently accumulating in the MZ. These results suggest that MGE-derived cortical interneurons, once arriving at the MZ, are released from regulation by guidance cues and initiate random walk movement, which potentially contributes to their dispersion throughout the cortex.