Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University

Japanese

Cancelling prism adaptation by a shift of background: a novel utility of allocentric coordinates for extracting motor errors

Journal J Neurosci 33, 7595-7602 (2013)
Authors Motoaki Uchimura (1, 2, 4), Shigeru Kitazawa (1, 2, 3, 4)
  1. Dynamic Brain Network Laboratory, Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University
  2. Department of Brain Physiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University
  3. Center for Information and Neural Networks (CiNet), National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, and Osaka University
  4. Department of Neurophysiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University
Title Cancelling prism adaptation by a shift of background: a novel utility of allocentric coordinates for extracting motor errors
PubMed 23616564
Laboratory Dynamic Brain Network Laboratory 〈Prof. Kitazawa〉
Abstract Many previous studies have reported that our brains are able to encode a target position not only in body-centered coordinates but also in terms of landmarks in the background. The importance of such allocentric memory increases when we are forced to complete a delayed reaching task after the target has disappeared. However, the merit of allocentric memory in natural situations in which we are free to make an immediate reach toward a target has remained elusive. We hypothesized that allocentric memory is essential even in an immediate reach for dissociating between error attributable to the motor system and error attributable to target motion. We show here in humans that prism adaptation, that is, adaptation of reaching movements in response to errors attributable to displacement of the visual field, can be cancelled or enhanced simply by moving the background in mid-flight of the reaching movement. The results provide direct evidence for the novel contribution of allocentric memory in providing information on “where I intended to go,” thereby discriminating the effect of target motion from the error resulting from the issued motor control signals.