COE Study Abroad Project Report

 

Report on the (1) the presentation at at the Neuroscience 2004 34th Annual Meeting(San Diego, U.S.A.) and Laboratory visitation (St. Louis, USA).

Takahisa Sanada , Doctoral student



Report on the presentation at the Neuroscience 2004 34th Annual Meeting(San Diego, USA) and Laboratory visitation (St. Louis, USA).

Destination
Neuroscience 2004 34th Annual Meeting(San Diego, USA)
Greg DeAngelis Laboratory, Washington University (St. Louis, USA)

Purpose
1. Participation in a satellite seminar of Neuroscience 2004 34th Annual Meeting(San Diego, USA)
2. Participation in Neuroscience 2004 34th Annual Meeting(San Diego, USA) and poster presentation.
3. Visitation of Greg DeAngelis Laboratory at Washington University (St. Louis, USA).

Schedule
10/21 Osaka (Japan) a San Francisco (USA) a Los Angeles a San Diego
10/22 Satellite seminar of Neuroscience 2004 34th Annual Meeting (San Diego, CA, USA)
10/23-27 Neuroscience 2004 34th Annual Meeting (San Diego, CA, USA)
10/28 San Diego a Denver a St. Louis
10/29 Visit Greg DeAngelis Laboratory at Washington Univ. (St. Louis, MO, USA).
10/30 St. Louis a Chicago a Osaka (Japan)

Result and prospective
On the first day after my arrival at San Diego, I attended a satellite seminar entitied "The Senses." The main topics of the saminar were initial processing of sensory information and combination of incoming information from different modalities. Although my main interests are in stereoscopic processing in the visual system, it is only a part of the larger sensory system that integrates information from other sensory systems such as auditory and somatosensory systems. Therefore, I was interested in how information from other sensory systems are integrated with that from the visual system. Many speakers using a wide variety of different approaches introduced their recent studies. Dr. McAlpine (UCL, London) presented characteristics of IPD (inter-aural phase difference) tuning which is an important index for detection of sound sources in the auditory cortex. Dr. Bremmer (Philipps
Univ., Germany) presented integration of visual information and head rotation signals in visual area VIP. Dr. Nicolelis (Duke Univ., Durham) introduced his recent work on implanting multi electrode array in rat cortex. He showed strong correlation between multiunit activity of barrel cortex and their behavior.
At the main conference, several presentations reported second-order functions of stereoscopic vision. Dr. Bredfeldt (NIH, Bethesda) reported neural responses to disparity edges in area V2. Mr. Nguyenkim (Washinton Univ., St. Louis) reported integration of monocular and binocular depth cues in the area MT. These sessions gave me new ideas to pursue experimentally. On the final day of the meeting, I gave a poster presentation of our research. The title was “Origin of surface slant selectivities in area -17 and -18 neurons”. We reported results from our study on mechanisms of surface slant selectivity in neurons in the early visual cortex. This function plays an important role for three-dimensional perception. During the poster session, many researchers came to our poster. I had intense but fruitful discussions with experts in the field, and got some valuable advices on data analyses and possible interpretations.
After the conference, I visited Dr. DeAngelis laboratory at Washington University in St. Louis. His group explores higher order mechanisms of stereoscopic vision in the area MT. Mr. Nguyenkim, a Ph.D. graduate student in Dr. DeAngelis' laboratory, has also investigated slant selective neurons in area MT. His approach and results are relevant to my study. I presented my poster and we exchanged ideas about mechanisms of the slant selectivity.
From this trip, I have received inspirations from many experts and fellow students and learned a lot. I will present my results as a publication and start working on next projects of my research on the visual system.